IELTS - (International English Language Testing System) and TOEFL

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SelfAccess.com has two types of online lessons for all levels of English study.
Academic English lessons are perfect for students who need to prepare for IELTS, TOEFL, FCE or TOEIC. These lessons are longer than the General English lessons and students intermediate level and above will find these very helpful for exam practice and preparation.
General English lessons range from elementary for beginners to advanced and include grammar, listening, writing, reading and comprehension activities.

All you need is a computer, the Internet and headphones or speakers so you can hear the online listening exercises.

Click here for online exam preparation courses.

IELTS - (International English Language Testing System)

IELTS is jointly managed by The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), The British Council and IDP Education Australia: IELTS Australia. IELTS tests reading, writing, listening and speaking. It is recognised worldwide. There are two modules of the IELTS Test - Academic module and the General Training module.

The IELTS Academic qualification is accepted as an entry requirement to universities in the U.K, Australia, North America and New Zealand. This module focuses on the English language skills which ESL students will need when studying or training in English.

The IELTS General qualification is accepted as an entry requirement for immigration to an English-speaking country.
For more information about the IELTS test, you could go to the www.ielts.org website.

Reading

The IELTS Academic Reading Module has three reading passages that become progressively more challenging. You are given 60 minutes to answer questions for all three passages.
IELTS reading practice The reading passages are on a variety of subjects and are chosen for their suitability for people entering university.

The types of skills the Reading Module assesses include:

  • identifying the gist of a passage
  • finding detailed factual information in a passage
  • identifying relationships between ideas or information items, such as: cause and effect order of events comparison
  • making inferences distinguishing between fact, assumption or opinion
  • understanding text organisation
  • summarising information

IELTS listening practiceListening

The listening section of the IELTS exam has four taped sections that become progressively more challenging. The IELTS listening passages are on a variety of current topics and are chosen for their suitability for people entering university.

The types of skills the Listening module assesses include:

  • identifying the gist of a conversation or monologue extracting specific factual information
  • identifying speaker roles
  • identifying relationships between ideas or pieces of information,
    such as: - cause and effect - order of events - comparison
  • following directions and instructions
  • identifying numbers, dates, time, etc.
  • making inferences
  • determining when a speaker is expressing fact, assumption or opinion.

IELTS writing practiceWriting

The IELTS Academic Writing Module consists of two activities: Writing Task 1 and Writing Task 2.

You are given 60 minutes to complete both tasks. The writing tasks are on a variety of subjects and are chosen for their suitability for candidates entering university, as are all our Reuters news articles.

In Writing Task 1, IELTS test candidates are asked to write a report describing information presented in the form of a graph, table or diagram. Many students find it difficult to understand and interpret graphs and statistics. At www.selfaccess.com we provide many examples of these exercises in a number of different ways to help increase confidence.

In Writing Task 2, you are asked to:

  • put forward a point of view on a given topic
  • argue in support of or against a given statement
  • propose a solution to a given problem
  • speculate on implications of a given issue

Use our model IELTS essays to help you pass IELTS.

TOEFL

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is an English test that measures the ability of non-native speakers of English (NESB) to use and understand North American English as it is used in college and university settings. TOEFL is used by North American universities and also in Australia, Britain and Europe to measure the English level of ESL students from non-English speaking countries who wish to enter undergraduate programmes.

The TOEFL test measures English language proficiency in reading, listening and writing. It is a computer-based exam and there is also a paper-and-pencil version of the TOEFL test.

Both the paper-based TOEFL test and the online TOEFL exam measure listening and the ability to understand English as it is spoken in North America, structure and grammar, reading and comprehension of short academic texts and writing.

The paper-based TOEFL test takes about 3.5 hours to complete and has three sections: Listening Comprehension, Structure and Written Expression which measures the ability to recognize standard written English and grammar, and Reading Comprehension.

The Test of Written English (TWE®) is also required for everyone taking the paper-based TOEFL test. TOEFL candidates have 30 minutes to write a short essay on an assigned topic.

The listening section of the paper based TOEFL test and the online computer based do differ. In the online TOEFL exam the questions integrate listening, visuals and reading skills so TOEFL test candidates must order steps or click on maps or pictures referred to in the listening texts. Questions are more challenging than in the paper based version of TOEFL because they involve such tasks as classification, ordering, referring, and insertion. Added to this, the listening section of the computer based TOEFL test is computer adaptive. This means that at the beginning of the section, TOEFL test candidates will be given one moderately difficult listening question. If the person answers correctly, the next question will be more difficult; if the person answers incorrectly, the next question will be easier. There is NOT a specific number of questions in this section. The number of questions the person receives depends on the answers given to questions.

The structure and written expression section of the computer based TOEFL test is also computer adaptive.

TOEFL is equivalent to the British IELTS (International English Language Testing System) examination.

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